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dc.contributor.authorSankoff, Gillian
dc.contributor.authorThibault, Pierrette
dc.contributor.authorNagy, Naomi
dc.contributor.authorBlondeau, Helene
dc.contributor.authorFonollosa, Marie Odile
dc.contributor.authorGagnon, Lucie
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-21T21:03:29Z
dc.date.available2009-08-21T21:03:29Z
dc.date.issued1997
dc.identifier.citationLanguage Variation and Change; 9(2): 191-218
dc.identifier.issn0954-3945
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10315/2817
dc.description.abstractUse of discourse markers by 17 speakers of Anglophone Montreal French (AMF) showed great variation in individual repertoires and frequency of use. Only five subjects manifested rates of usage comparable to those native speakers or to their own L1 usage in English. In decreasing order of frequency, the speakers used tu sais 'y'know'; la 'there' (the most frequent among L1 Montreal French speakers); bon 'good', alors 'so', comme 'like', and bien 'well'; and the local discourse conjunction fait que 'so'. The subjects occasionally made use of the English markers you know, so, like, and well. Quebecois French markers with no English equivalent were used by the speakers who had been exposed to French in their early childhood environment. The one marker that showed influence from English was comme, apparently calqued on English like. Overall, frequent use of discourse markers correlated only with the speakers' knowledge of French grammar—evidence that a higher frequency of discourse marker use is the hallmark of the fluent speaker. As a feature that is not explicitly taught in school, mastery of the appropriate use of discourse markers is thus particularly revealing of the speakers' integration into the local speech community.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherCambridge University Press; http://www.cambridge.org/
dc.subjectSecond Language Variation
dc.subjectMinority Language Variation
dc.subjectSociolinguistic variation
dc.subjectFrench as a Second Language
dc.subjectFrench -- Quebec
dc.subjectFrench
dc.titleVariation in the use of discourse markers in a language contact situation
dc.typeArticle


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