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dc.contributor.authorGrace, Sherry
dc.contributor.authorFaire, Terry
dc.contributor.authorOh, Paul
dc.contributor.authorPriorc, Peter L.
dc.contributor.authorTan, Yongyao
dc.contributor.authorPolyzotis, Peter A.
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-29T15:44:51Z
dc.date.available2021-03-29T15:44:51Z
dc.date.issued2012-11
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Cardiovascular Medicine: November 2012 - Volume 13 - Issue 11 - p 727-734en_US
dc.identifier.issn1558-2027
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.2459/JCM.0b013e32835794c1en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10315/38271
dc.description.abstractAims Cardiac rehabilitation programs develop in accordance with guidelines, but also in response to local needs and resources. This study evaluated features of Ontario cardiac rehabilitation programs in accordance with guidelines, emerging evidence and treating underserved populations. Methods In this cross-sectional study, all Ontario cardiac rehabilitation programs were mailed an investigator-generated survey. Responses were received from 38 of 45 (84.4%) programs. Results Twenty-seven (71.1%) cardiac rehabilitation programs were located within a hospital. Twenty-four (63.2%) programs reported that they offer two sessions of exercise and education per week. Twenty-six (68.4%) programs offered an alternative model of program delivery other than on-site, with 10 (27.0%) programs reporting they tailored their programs to rural patients. Twenty-three (62.2%) programs provided services to patients with a noncardiac primary indication. Twenty-six (68.4%) programs systematically screened patients for depressive symptoms. Twenty-seven (71.1%) offered resources to patients post graduation. Conclusion Most cardiac rehabilitation programs offered alternative models of care, such as home-based rehabilitation. Cardiac rehabilitation sites are well integrated within their community, enabling smooth postcardiac rehabilitation transitions for patients. Cardiac rehabilitation programs continue to offer proven comprehensive components, while simultaneously attempting to adapt to meet the needs of patients with other chronic diseases.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWolters Kluweren_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rightsLWW This is a non-final version of an article published in final form in (Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine: November 2012 - Volume 13 - Issue 11 - p 727-734). https://cdn-tp2.mozu.com/16833-m1/cms/files/Author-Document.pdf?_mzts=636519775710000000
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectcardiovascular diseasesen_US
dc.subjectcontinuity of patient careen_US
dc.subjecthealth services accessibilityen_US
dc.subjectrehabilitationen_US
dc.titleCardiac Rehabilitation Services in Ontario: Components, Models, and Under-Served Groupsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.journalhttps://journals.lww.com/jcardiovascularmedicine/pages/default.aspxen_US
dc.rights.publisherhttps://www.wolterskluwer.com/en-caen_US
dc.rights.articlehttps://journals.lww.com/jcardiovascularmedicine/Abstract/2012/11000/Cardiac_rehabilitation_services_in_Ontario_.9.aspxen_US


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Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International