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Impacts of Transportation Planning on Economic Development: The relationship between economic, social, and environmental variables and transit hubs measured through spatial statistics

Impacts of Transportation Planning on Economic Development: The relationship between economic, social, and environmental variables and transit hubs measured through spatial statistics

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Title: Impacts of Transportation Planning on Economic Development: The relationship between economic, social, and environmental variables and transit hubs measured through spatial statistics
Author: Di Febo, Michael
Identifier: MESMP02778
Abstract: The objective of this research is to identify the rate of change surrounding transit lines in the regions of Montreal, Vancouver, and Toronto. The rate of change is observed through a sustainability lens bringing to light the economic, social and environmental perspective. The shift between once rural to urban settlement had advanced the study of globalization research.

Through the adoption of Canadian census and satellite imaging a 25-year rate of change analysis is performed. A total of seven variables are measured to identify whether a consistent rate of change could be retrieved between the 1981 and 2006 census years: (1) average dwelling value; (2) average number of rooms per dwelling; (3) average gross monthly rent; (4) average household income represent economic variables; (5) population density; (6) average number of persons per household represent social variables; and (7) the removal of green space represents environmental variables.

In the case of Metropolitan Vancouver, data shows a strong relationship between the rates of change in variables over the 25-year period meaning growth and development occurred along transit. In the case of the City of Toronto, data points to moderate development along the selected transit line. In the case of Metropolitan Montreal, no distinct rate of change was observed meaning that transit did not foster urban development growth.
Type: Major Paper
Rights: Author owns copyright, except where explicitly noted. Please contact the author directly with licensing requests.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/34722
Citation: Major Paper, Master of Environmental Studies, Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University
Date: 2017

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