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Social support, self-esteem, and stress as predictors of adjustment to university among first year undergraduates

Social support, self-esteem, and stress as predictors of adjustment to university among first year undergraduates

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Title: Social support, self-esteem, and stress as predictors of adjustment to university among first year undergraduates
Author: Friedlander, Laura J.
Reid, Graham J.
Shupak, Naomi
Cribbie, Robert A.
Abstract: The current study examined the joint effects of stress, social support, and self-esteem on adjustment to university. First-year undergraduate students (N = 115) were assessed during the first semester and again 10 weeks later, during the second semester of the academic year. Multiple regressions predicting adjustment to university from perceived social support (friends and family), self-esteem (academic, social, and global), and stress were conducted. From the fall to winter semesters, increased social support from friends, but not from family, predicted improved adjustment. Decreased stress predicted improved overall, academic, personal-emotional, and social adjustment. Increased global, academic, and social self-esteem predicted decreased depression and increased academic and social adjustment. Results are discussed with respect to potential mechanisms through which support and self-esteem may operate.
Sponsor: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council
Subject: stress
social support
self-esteem
Type: Article
Rights: https://muse.jhu.edu/article/215252
URI: https://doi.org/10.1353/csd.2007.0024
http://hdl.handle.net/10315/34625
Published: Johns Hopkins University Press
Citation: Friedlander, L., Reid, G., Shupak, N. & Cribbie, R. A. (2007). Social support, self-esteem, and stress as predictors of adjustment to university among first year undergraduates. College Student Development, 48, 259-274. doi: 10.1353/csd.2007.0024
Date: 2007

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