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Painted Tonsures and Potato-sellers: Priests, Passing and Survival in the Asturian Revolution

Painted Tonsures and Potato-sellers: Priests, Passing and Survival in the Asturian Revolution

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Title: Painted Tonsures and Potato-sellers: Priests, Passing and Survival in the Asturian Revolution
Author: Kerry, Matthew
Abstract: The Asturian revolutionary insurrection of 1934 saw the greatest outburst of anticlerical bloodletting in Spain for a century and prefigured the dramatic wave of anticlerical violence during the Spanish Civil War. Scholars have neglected, however, to study the experience of clerical survival. This article analyses how members of the clergy survived the insurrection through the prism of passing, concentrating on cleric's dress, gestures and revolutionary performances. It demonstrates the need to study survival processes, sheds new light on clerical identity, agency and existing cultural gulfs in 1930s' Spain, and underlines the contingency of violence in revolutionary contexts.
Subject: Spain
anticlericalism
Second Republic
Spanish Civil War
Violence
survival
Catholic Church
performance
Type: Article
Rights: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Cultural & Social History on 21/02/2017, available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14780038.2017.1290996 Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14780038.2017.1290996
http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rfcs20/current
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/ca/
URI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14780038.2017.1290996
http://hdl.handle.net/10315/32865
Published: Taylor and Francis
ISSN: 1478-0046 ; 1478-0038
Date: 2017-02-21

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This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Cultural & Social History on 21/02/2017, available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14780038.2017.1290996 Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Cultural & Social History on 21/02/2017, available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14780038.2017.1290996