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dc.contributor.advisorStruthers, C. Ward
dc.creatorKhoury, Careen H.
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-26T14:23:04Z
dc.date.available2015-01-26T14:23:04Z
dc.date.copyright2014-06-10
dc.date.issued2015-01-26
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10315/28191
dc.description.abstractThe primary aim of this Dissertation was to investigate the effect of power on victims’ decision to seek revenge against, or hold a grudge against, or forgive the transgressor following a transgression. The secondary aim of this Dissertation was to examine one potential boundary condition as well as potential mechanisms that underlie these effects. Guided by the approach/inhibition theory of power (Keltner et al., 2003), it was hypothesized that power would have a differential effect on post-transgression responses. As predicted, Study 1 showed that power had a positive effect on revenge and a negative effect on grudge. Also as predicted, Study 2 showed that approach motivation was one mechanism underlying the power-revenge relation and inhibition motivation was one mechanism underlying the power-grudge relation. In both studies, power did not have an effect on forgiveness. In addition, Studies 3 and 4 demonstrated the moderating role of assurance of no future transgression on the relation between power and post-transgression responses. Under conditions of assurance, powerful and powerless victims were less likely to seek revenge and hold a grudge, respectively, and were more likely to forgive. Finally and contrary to the prediction, results from Study 4 showed that there was no evidence for the mediational role of victims’ ‘lack of a need to teach the transgressor a lesson’ and ‘safety’ on the moderation between power and assurance on post-transgression responses. Possible explanations of these results and limitations of this research are discussed.
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsAuthor owns copyright, except where explicitly noted. Please contact the author directly with licensing requests.
dc.subjectSocial psychology
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectOrganizational behavior
dc.titleThe Effects of Power and Assurance of No Future Transgressions on Post-Transgression Responses
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.degree.disciplinePsychology (Functional Area: Social and Personality)
dc.degree.namePhD - Doctor of Philosophy
dc.degree.levelDoctoral
dc.date.updated2015-01-26T14:23:03Z
dc.subject.keywordsForgivenessen_US
dc.subject.keywordsPoweren_US
dc.subject.keywordsAssuranceen_US
dc.subject.keywordsRevengeen_US
dc.subject.keywordsGrudgeen_US


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