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dc.contributor.advisorConnolly, Jennifer A.
dc.contributor.authorWincentak, Katherine Jessica
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-03T14:24:32Z
dc.date.available2022-03-03T14:24:32Z
dc.date.copyright2021-12
dc.date.issued2022-03-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10315/39148
dc.description.abstractAim: The aim of the present study was to advance the understanding of academic resilience among girls in the care of child protective services. Using a developmental framework of resilience this research examined: the academic experiences of girls in care, the capacity of girls in care to form positive self- perceptions, as well as secure, supportive relationships, and the influence of self-perceptions and interpersonal connections on academic resilience. Method: A mixed methods design was used, where 44 adolescent girls in care completed interviews and questionnaires. Their caseworkers provided additional background information. Qualitatively, academic resilience was examined through girls' accounts of their educational experiences and their views of self and others in relation to their academic progress. Quantitative indicators of academic resilience included enrollment history, attendance, engagement, achievement, and progress through the standard curriculum. Analyses included an integration of qualitative and quantitative data. Results: A thematic analysis indicated that participants' accounts of their academic / career path fell along a spectrum. Five sub-themes capturing different sets of experiences were defined: diverted, stuck behind, catching up, on track, and succeeding. Resilience was interrelated with self-perceptions and interpersonal connections as participants described experiencing helplessness, dependence, self-reliance, or autonomy through connection. Quantitative findings indicated that participants views of their own academic progress were correlated with external indicators of academic progress. As predicted, higher self-esteem and more secure relational styles were also linked with academic resilience. A content analysis revealed that the presence of a more extensive support network, and the experience of autonomy in one's own academic / career path, were associated with multiple markers of academic resilience. Discussion: Findings from the present study reinforce the importance of using mixed methods designs when working with vulnerable populations. Findings suggest that conditions supporting resilience are optimized when the need to feel worthy and autonomous functions in harmony with the need to be connected to others who are supportive and safe. Strategic, developmentally grounded interventions promoting the development of adaptive self-perceptions and secure relationships within broader networks of caring individuals have the potential to mitigate poor educational outcomes and enhance the lives of girls in care.
dc.languageen
dc.rightsAuthor owns copyright, except where explicitly noted. Please contact the author directly with licensing requests.
dc.subjectDevelopmental psychology
dc.titleGirls in Child Protective Services: A Mixed Methods Exploration of Self-Perceptions, Interpersonal Connections, and Academic Resilience
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.degree.disciplinePsychology (Functional Area: Clinical-Developmental)
dc.degree.namePhD - Doctor of Philosophy
dc.degree.levelDoctoral
dc.date.updated2022-03-03T14:24:32Z
dc.subject.keywordsDevelopmental psychology
dc.subject.keywordsResilience
dc.subject.keywordsAcademics
dc.subject.keywordsEducation
dc.subject.keywordsAdolescence
dc.subject.keywordsMaltreatment
dc.subject.keywordsChild protective services
dc.subject.keywordsChild welfare
dc.subject.keywordsFoster care


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