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dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Sarah Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-14T16:35:20Z
dc.date.available2022-01-14T16:35:20Z
dc.date.issued2013-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10315/38915
dc.descriptioncase studies, classroom observations, interviewsen_US
dc.description.abstractThis longitudinal multi‐case study followed four new science teachers over the course of five years. Its purpose was to examine the ways in which new science teachers integrate science‐technology‐society-environment (STSE) and inquiry‐based work into their teaching. I am particularly interested in new science teachers not only because of my work with prospective science teachers at York University’s Faculty of Education but also because this is a group that is simultaneously expected to usher in new and innovative approaches to teaching while receiving very little subject‐specific professional development to support their efforts (Luft, 2007).en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipYork University, Faculty of Education Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (internal grant - York University)en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectphysicsen_US
dc.subjectsecondary schoolen_US
dc.subjectelementary schoolen_US
dc.subjectteachersen_US
dc.subjectprofessional developmenten_US
dc.subjectnew teachersen_US
dc.titleEvolution of new teachers' beliefs about teaching STSE: Report to school boardsen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US


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