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dc.contributor.authorPerkins, Patricia E. (Ellie)
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-02T04:15:08Z
dc.date.available2020-03-02T04:15:08Z
dc.date.issued1994
dc.identifier.citation“NAFTA and the future of environmental regulation.” Comment in Constitutional Quarterly . Centre for Constitutional Studies, University of Alberta, Vol. 5, Nos. 3 & 4, Spring/Summer, pp. 68-71.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://yorkspace.library.yorku.ca/xmlui/handle/10315/37047
dc.descriptionWhile NAFTA contains more "green" language than any previous trade pact, the agreement is also unprecedented in the freedom it allows investors and the extent to which it curtails government policy flexibility - important areas of concern for the environment. Especially in Canada, where environmental policy is primarily a provincial responsibility, questions have arisen about the workability and constitutionality of federally-negotiated international agreements like NAFTA which may have broad impacts on the ability of provincial governments to regulate and set environmental policy. Without embarking on constitutional questions in detail, this paper briefly explores some of the environmental policy issues raised by NAFTAen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCentre for Constitutional Studies, University of Albertaen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/ca/*
dc.subjectNAFTAen_US
dc.subjectenvironmental regulationen_US
dc.subjecttradeen_US
dc.subjectenvironmenten_US
dc.subjectecologyen_US
dc.subjectenvironmental policyen_US
dc.titleNAFTA and the Future of Environmental Regulationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Canada