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dc.contributor.advisorRahn, D. Jay
dc.creatorKoumoulas, Markos
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-17T12:44:05Z
dc.date.available2019-05-17T12:44:05Z
dc.date.copyright2018-12-04
dc.date.issued2019-05-17
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10315/36211
dc.description.abstractThe didgeridoo is a unique musical instrument considered to be one of the worlds oldest instruments. It plays an integral part in Australian Aboriginal history, spirituality, rituals and ceremonies. Didgeridoo playing is solely based on oral tradition with varying techniques and interpretations among Aboriginal communities. For non-Aboriginal musicians and composers, the didgeridoo lacks the status of a serious instrument and is often viewed as a novelty instrument. This may be why there is a lack of didgeridoo notation and its misrepresentation in the western notation world. This paper presents a Didgeridoo Notation Lexicon which will allow non-didgeridoo composers to understand a readable legend and incorporate the didgeridoo into their compositions. The need for didgeridoo notation will be discussed and analyzed in comparison to previous notation attempts of composers and musicologists such as Sean OBoyle, Liza Lim, Harold Kacanek and Wulfin Lieske. In the past, the inclusion of the didgeridoo in orchestral contexts has predominately been focussed on its associated Aboriginal imagery regarding dreamtime and spirituality. Conversely, my original composition fully integrates the didgeridoo within the orchestra as an equal instrument, not a focal point to advance a particular theme. I travelled to Cairns, Australia to interview world-renowned didgeridoo player, David Hudson. Hudsons insight, experience and knowledge of the Aboriginal community supported the creation of a Didgeridoo Notation Lexicon. This paper attempts to educate and inspire composers and musicologists to appreciate the intricacies of the didgeridoo and elevate its role in western composition.
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsAuthor owns copyright, except where explicitly noted. Please contact the author directly with licensing requests.
dc.subjectMusic Education
dc.titleDidgeridoo Notation
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.degree.disciplineMusic
dc.degree.nameMA - Master of Arts
dc.degree.levelMaster's
dc.date.updated2019-05-17T12:44:05Z
dc.subject.keywordsdidgeridoo
dc.subject.keywordsaboriginal
dc.subject.keywordsaustralia
dc.subject.keywordsmusic
dc.subject.keywordsoceania
dc.subject.keywordsnotation
dc.subject.keywordsperformance
dc.subject.keywordscomposition
dc.subject.keywordschamber orchestra
dc.subject.keywordsinstrumentation
dc.subject.keywordsorchestration
dc.subject.keywordscomposers
dc.subject.keywordsmusicology
dc.subject.keywordsethnomusicology
dc.subject.keywordsdreamtime
dc.subject.keywordsdavid hudson
dc.subject.keywordsworld music
dc.subject.keywordsmusic in australia
dc.subject.keywordsindigenous
dc.subject.keywordsindigenous music
dc.subject.keywordsaustralian music


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