Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorFlett, Gordon L.
dc.creatorHassan, Sabrina
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-28T12:46:28Z
dc.date.available2018-05-28T12:46:28Z
dc.date.copyright2017-10-25
dc.date.issued2018-05-28
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10315/34491
dc.description.abstractPerfectionism has been linked with various indices of maladjustment but has not yet been formally investigated in persons with psychotic illness. There is also a call for more psychological formulations of psychotic illness and related interventions for assisting affected persons, particularly given the relevance of trauma in the development of psychosis. Accordingly, an exploratory study was conducted to evaluate socially prescribed perfectionism, perfectionistic self-presentation, and distress tolerance as psychological vulnerabilities associated with poorer theory of mind, stronger traumatic impact, and worse psychological distress in persons with psychotic illness. A sample of 61 persons with a diagnosed psychotic illness was recruited from a tertiary care organization in Toronto, Canada. Correlational results suggest that, as predicted, higher trait perfectionism and higher perfectionistic self-presentation were associated with lower distress tolerance, more shame, greater stress, and poorer theory of mind. Lower distress tolerance was also associated with elevated stress, shame, and poorer theory of mind. The results also support conceptual overlap among perfectionism, social anxiety, and paranoid ideation in persons with psychotic illness. A trauma-informed person-centered clinical formulation is presented, describing how perfectionism, perfectionistic self-presentation, and low distress tolerance may stem from disrupted attachment experiences and other circumstances with associated traumatic impact. Formulation-based clinical approaches that may benefit affected persons are described. The study results are also contextualized within the broader literatures on psychosis, perfectionism, trauma, and psychotherapy. Finally, future research directions are indicated.
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsAuthor owns copyright, except where explicitly noted. Please contact the author directly with licensing requests.
dc.subjectMental health
dc.titlePerfectionism and Distress Tolerance as Psychological Vulnerabilities to Traumatic Impact and Psychological Distress in Persons with Psychotic Illness
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.degree.disciplinePsychology(Functional Area: Clinical Psychology)
dc.degree.namePhD - Doctor of Philosophy
dc.degree.levelDoctoral
dc.date.updated2018-05-28T12:46:28Z
dc.subject.keywordsPerfectionism
dc.subject.keywordsPerfectionistic self-presentation
dc.subject.keywordsDistress tolerance
dc.subject.keywordsPersonality
dc.subject.keywordsTheory of mind
dc.subject.keywordsShame
dc.subject.keywordsEmotion regulation
dc.subject.keywordsTrauma
dc.subject.keywordsTraumatic impact
dc.subject.keywordsLife events
dc.subject.keywordsTraumatic events
dc.subject.keywordsPsychotic illness
dc.subject.keywordsPsychosis
dc.subject.keywordsPsychotic disorder
dc.subject.keywordsSchizophrenia
dc.subject.keywordsSchizophrenia spectrum disorder
dc.subject.keywordsSocial anxiety
dc.subject.keywordsParanoid ideation
dc.subject.keywordsPsychological distress
dc.subject.keywordsVulnerability
dc.subject.keywordsPsychotherapy
dc.subject.keywordsTreatment
dc.subject.keywordsIntegrative psychotherapy
dc.subject.keywordsAttachment
dc.subject.keywordsFormulation


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


All items in the YorkSpace institutional repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved except where explicitly noted.