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How Do the Homeless See Their Own Health Problems and Needs?

How Do the Homeless See Their Own Health Problems and Needs?

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Title: How Do the Homeless See Their Own Health Problems and Needs?
Author: Daiski, Isolde
Identifier: 00012
Abstract: Because the homeless have no stable housing, they are at a greater risk of developing chronic health problems than those who are housed. Homeless people are also more likely to develop conditions like arthritis at an earlier age as a result of their poverty and living conditions. The first step to combating these health problems is an open and accepting attitude towards the homeless from support workers and the general public. The social exclusion which homeless people experience every day leads to, and further reinforces, stress, addictions, and mental health problems. Homeless shelters need to have a more welcoming atmosphere with greater safety and fewer restrictions on the lives of homeless people. Lastly, providing affordable and safe housing is the only long-term solution to the widespread health problems of the homeless.
Sponsor: York's Knowledge Mobilization Unit provides services and funding for faculty, graduate students, and community organizations seeking to maximize the impact of academic research and expertise on public policy, social programming, and professional practice. It is supported by SSHRC and CIHR grants, and by the Office of the Vice-President Research & Innovation. kmbunit@yorku.ca www.researchimpact.ca
Subject: Public Health
Homelessness
Type: Research Summary
Rights: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.5 Canada
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/ca/
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/29097
Citation: Daiski, I. (2007). Perspectives of homeless people on their health and health needs priorities. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 58(3), 273-281.
Date: 2008

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Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.5 Canada Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.5 Canada