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dc.contributor.authorBell, Chris
dc.contributor.authorRupp, Deborah E.
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-21T17:50:15Z
dc.date.available2015-05-21T17:50:15Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier00008
dc.identifier.citationRupp, D. E., & Bell, C. M. (2010). Extending the deontic model of justice: Moral self-regulation in third-party responses to injustice. Business Ethics Quarterly, 20(1), 89-106.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10315/29093
dc.descriptionen_US
dc.description.abstractWhen people decide to punish others, their choice is driven almost entirely by retribution. However, the decision not to punish, although often interpreted as self-interested or morally disinterested, may in fact be based on powerful moral self-reflection and considerations.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipYork's Knowledge Mobilization Unit provides services and funding for faculty, graduate students, and community organizations seeking to maximize the impact of academic research and expertise on public policy, social programming, and professional practice. It is supported by SSHRC and CIHR grants, and by the Office of the Vice-President Research & Innovation. kmbunit@yorku.ca www.researchimpact.caen_US
dc.relationYork Universityen_US
dc.relation.urien_US
dc.rightsAttribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.5 Canadaen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/ca/en_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectEthicsen_US
dc.subjectWorkplaceen_US
dc.titleRetribution Drives Our Decisions to Punish, but Punishment Is Not the Only Moral Choiceen_US
dc.typeResearch Summaryen_US


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