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dc.contributor.advisorMurray, Stuart
dc.creatorMartel, Sara Lyn
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-26T14:45:37Z
dc.date.available2015-01-26T14:45:37Z
dc.date.copyright2014-07-17
dc.date.issued2015-01-26
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10315/28229
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation explores End-of-Life (EOL) photography, a common practice in North American hospitals whereby nurses facilitate photography for families around the death of their newborn. It is based on a qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews with 10 parents bereaved by a neonatal death in the last five years, who all participated in EOL photography in the same Canadian neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The focusing research question asked how parents experience this photography within the NICU setting and in their lives beyond the hospital. The study’s methodology combines the existential phenomenology of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and the critical theory of Michel Foucault to consider the intersections of lived experience, media technologies and the material structures of power/knowledge. The method is modeled on an interpretive phenomenological analysis approach involving an embodied hermeneutic and integrating photo elicitation, as the participants were invited to bring their EOL photographs to the interviews. The dissertation situates EOL photography within the contemporary NICU, revealing the practice as an experience of living relationships between nurses, parents and newborns in the biomedical setting. It considers how the move from film to digital photography developed the practice from “memento-making” to collaborative “story-telling.” New opportunities to construct the newborn’s life-story is shown to be integral to the parents’ knowing their newborn in life and healing from their death, yet opens complex questions around sharing this life-story within the families’ social sphere. The dissertation reflects on these experiences in the context of a broader sociocultural ambiguity around death-in-birth, connecting EOL photography with the politics of biomedical reproduction and end-of-life. The dissertation concludes by conceptualizing EOL photography as a practice of palliative space-time, which works towards presence, proximity, attention, and care into end-of-life in a biomedical setting.
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsAuthor owns copyright, except where explicitly noted. Please contact the author directly with licensing requests.
dc.subjectCommunication
dc.subjectNursing
dc.titlePicturing Life Stories in a Biomedical Setting: A Phenomenological Analysis of Neonatal End-of-Life Photography
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.degree.disciplineCommunication & Culture, Joint Program with Ryerson University
dc.degree.namePhD - Doctor of Philosophy
dc.degree.levelDoctoral
dc.date.updated2015-01-26T14:45:37Z
dc.subject.keywordsInterpretive phenomenological analysisen_US
dc.subject.keywordsCommunicationen_US
dc.subject.keywordsMediaen_US
dc.subject.keywordsPhotographyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsCameraen_US
dc.subject.keywordsTechnologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsVisualen_US
dc.subject.keywordsCultureen_US
dc.subject.keywordsNursingen_US
dc.subject.keywordsHealth communicationen_US
dc.subject.keywordsNeonatal healthen_US
dc.subject.keywordsPerinatal healthen_US
dc.subject.keywordsBiomedicineen_US
dc.subject.keywordsReproductive politicsen_US
dc.subject.keywordsDeathen_US
dc.subject.keywordsGriefen_US
dc.subject.keywordsLossen_US
dc.subject.keywordsBereavementen_US
dc.subject.keywordsMourningen_US
dc.subject.keywordsPalliative careen_US
dc.subject.keywordsEnd-of-lifeen_US
dc.subject.keywordsPhenomenologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsMerleau-Pontyen_US
dc.subject.keywordsEmbodied hermeneuticsen_US
dc.subject.keywordsPhoto elicitationen_US
dc.subject.keywordsMaterialityen_US
dc.subject.keywordsFeminist theoryen_US


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