Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHarmes, Adam
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-21T18:59:55Z
dc.date.available2008-08-21T18:59:55Z
dc.date.issued1999-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10315/1390
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.yorku.ca/yciss/publications/OP57-Harmes.pdf
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this paper is to determine whether states retain the capacity to engage in financial and monetary forms of diplomacy within the present context of liberalized international capital markets. In doing so, it argues that what has been ignored in much of the current international relations literature is the historically unique characteristics of certain non-state financial actors and the opportunities which they may afford for the use of state power. Specifically, by demonstrating the increasing authority which is being exercised by hedge funds and how this authority is serving to re-centralize investment decisionmaking, this paper argues that these funds may provide a renewed site through which states might exercise financial and monetary forms of power.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherYCISSen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesOccasional Paperen
dc.relation.ispartofseries57en
dc.rights.urihttp://www.yorku.ca/yciss/
dc.subjectglobal investorsen
dc.subjectnational interestsen
dc.subjectinstitutional investorsen
dc.subjectherd behaviouren
dc.subjectmarket manipulationen
dc.subjecthedge fund nationalismen
dc.subjecthedge fund socialismen
dc.titleHedge Funds as a Weapon of State?: Financial and Monetary Power in an Era of Liberalized Financeen
dc.typeOtheren


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


All items in the YorkSpace institutional repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved except where explicitly noted.